Cost of teak coamings

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lsheaf
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Cost of teak coamings

Post by lsheaf »

Hey guys,

What would you expect to pay for two pieces of team that measure 10” tall x 1” wide x 9 feet long?
I was quoted locally in the Caribbean $1050 before milling. That sounds pretty crazy to me.
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atomvoyager
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Re: Cost of teak coamings

Post by atomvoyager »

Last time I bought some for an Alberg 30 from Maritime Wood Products in FL 5 years ago it was $26 per board foot for 3/4" x 11" x 93" length was $400 for two pieces. Less wide planks are sold cheaper so you could try epoxy gluing two together on edge. If you can't find affordable teak you might try using iroko or one of the so-called African mahoganies like sapele and always keep it maintained with varnish. Or use some cheaper wood or repair your existing damaged wood with epoxy fillers
of even fiberglass over cracks and seal it in epoxy resin and paint it some contrasting color like a brown wood color. Maybe someone else has some suggestion?
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Re: Cost of teak coamings

Post by CapnK »

After seeing it in use on docks and decking, I'd thought of using Ipe because it is so tough and durable. Drawback is that it is a rare and expensive wood, and not very sustainable from what I've read.

One alternative that has similar characteristics is Cumaru (aka Brazilian Teak, Dipteryx Odorata, Almendrillo, Tonka, and Tonquin Bean), and it's supposed to be 1/3 or so cheaper than Ipe. It is, like Ipe, very dense and not the easiest to work.

Sounds kind of crazy maybe, but why not build a thin skinned foam cored board in the shape needed, and then epoxy a veneer (or 3) onto it? If kept up, I'd think that would last. It would be lighter by a fair bit. Thoughts?
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atomvoyager
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Re: Cost of teak coamings

Post by atomvoyager »

If you want to keep it varnished or sealed with a two-part clear coating then there are many woods you could choose. A veneered foam board is interesting. Coamings often have fasteners for cleats, winch bases, dodger attachment and so on so you'd need to engineer around that and then adding veneer around edges may be a problem. Probably need to add a solid wood edge trim in places at the least. And veneers are so thin you'd have to be extra careful on maintenance. Veneer may work good though on interior glassed foam panels where you want to save weight, such as on my F24 Corsair trimaran that I've been upgrading recently.
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