Divinycell

Talk about favorite or hated suppliers, recommend good materials or sources, or anything of the same ilk. This is also a good place to suggest unique ideas and innovations you may have come up with.
Post Reply
lsheaf
Deck Grunge Scrubber
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Sep 10, 2019 8:41 pm
Boat Name: Stardust
Boat Type: Allied Seawind 30

Divinycell

Post by lsheaf »

Hey there,

For building the Atom 6.5 out of divinycell, is it recommended to use the H-80 or the H-130 plain core? There seems to be a pretty big difference in price. I assume the H-80 should be suffice.

Logan
User avatar
atomvoyager
Moderator | Revitalizer of Classics
Posts: 272
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2018 7:48 am
Boat Name: Atom
Boat Type: Pearson Triton
Contact:

Re: Divinycell

Post by atomvoyager »

Yes H-80 is sufficient. I haven't actually built a dinghy from Divinycell yet but would do that next time to prevent rot, increase flooded buoyancy and hopefully save a little weight. You'll have to work out the construction method and lightest way to use fiberglass to stiffen it up without overdoing it. I'm thinking 3/8" core and a single layer of 9-10 oz cloth for all the panels and then add some extra in any high stress areas. One option is to glass all the panels on a table after you cut them out and then put it together with glass tape. But that may be awkward to and weigh more than stitch and glue the panels together as when using plywood and then add the glass overall. I hope you can post a thread on this project so we can see how it goes. Maybe someone else who has already done this can add their ideas.
lsheaf
Deck Grunge Scrubber
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Sep 10, 2019 8:41 pm
Boat Name: Stardust
Boat Type: Allied Seawind 30

Re: Divinycell

Post by lsheaf »

Yes I will definitely post progress reports on the 6.5 build. I think for the bottom panel I’ll go with 1 layer of 1708 as it will be my daily driver and have to drag it up the beach everyday. I also have a scale big enough to weigh it when it’s done.

I have never worked with divinycell but have worked with a high density closed cell foam for rebuilding my refrigeration box. If the materials are at all alike, I imagine I could stick all of the panels together with toothpicks or my girlfriend’s leftover Polynesian pork skewers. All jokes aside, I think that may be a good solution for constructing the panels prior to fiberglassing.
CapnK
Site Admin
Posts: 186
Joined: Thu Aug 25, 2005 10:28 am
Location: Winyah Bay, Georgetown SC

Re: Divinycell

Post by CapnK »

FWIW, when making surfboards (even for the North Shore), lamination schedule on the decks was typically done with 4 or 6 oz, adding a second layer on the 3/4 length foot patch.
Double 4 oz was a competition board, doubled 6 oz was considered heavy duty, everyday boards were 6/4.
This over expanded PU foam which though dense, I don't think was as rigid as is Divinycel.
For most people, this was enough glass to keep dimpling on the deck to a minimum.

I'd think you could go 6 oz or maybe 2x4oz all over, hit the bottom exterior corners and stem with a 4" wide tape of the 1708, and maybe a couple 4" strips underfoot inside. Find a surfboard ding repair kit with UV-activated resin and stick that in the dinghy box for quick emergency repair if you poke a hole in it. :)
Kurt and Barque, the CrewDog.
Melelani, Islander 36 (shoal)<- Home!
Katie Marie, Ariel #422

For Sale: Sundance, '71 A-30, #429

sailFar.net - Small boats, Long distances...
Post Reply