Bristol Corinthian

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Bristol Corinthian

Postby Clinton B Chase » Sun Mar 15, 2009 5:51 am

To dovetail a little bit with the Sailmaster 22 thread, I have also been looking for a similar boat and looked at a Corinthian yesterday at Northeast Sailboat Rescue. They are very nice little boats. Not as big as the Sailmaster, but the cockpit looks as big. I think they'd be slightly more performance friendly...I'd have to compare the number. The Corinthian has a convenient outboard motor well. My little guy loved climbing around it and really wants it!

The only glasswork I saw that was necessary (I haven't sounded the decks but it feels firm) was the deck beam where the outer skins of glass have cracked open like a bit laceration. Not really any delamination yet.

Any feedback on Corinthians?

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Postby David » Sun Mar 15, 2009 8:24 am

Alberg design; over 700 built. You can read more about them here:

http://www.bristolowners.org/19/bristol19.html
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Postby triton318 » Mon Mar 16, 2009 6:46 am

I'm trying to get one ready to sail to Bermuda in June. I bought mine for 300.00 in November. I completely gutted it and am in the process of building out a sea-going cockpit and a new interior. Unfortunately, I can't comment and how well a Corinthian sails, because I haven't sailed her yet. It's basically a miniature Triton (or any other classic Alberg designed boat). I've exchanged a few emails with Corinthian owners who say they sail very well. I had trouble finding an outboard to fit in the motor well that also fit my limited budget; I finally bought a 3 HP British Seagull and just finished rebuilding it. (Amazing little motors...)

The decision by the builder to completely fill the lazerette and forepeak with foam was, in my opinion, a bad one. With the foam there, it's impossible to get to the mounting nuts for the deck hardware on the bow and stern. The only way I could see to re-bed this hardware was to remove the foam. I would have anyway, because I wanted the space for storage.

Also, there were several instances of fiberglass tabbing coming away from plywood bulkheads and fiberglass cloth that hadn't been adequately saturated with resin.

However, I think that for the most part, the boats were pretty well built.
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Postby David » Mon Mar 16, 2009 7:44 am

I would guess that the foam you speak of is an owner installed "option" and not from Bristol.
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Postby triton318 » Tue Mar 17, 2009 7:38 am

David wrote:I would guess that the foam you speak of is an owner installed "option" and not from Bristol.


I don't know if it was an owner installed option or not. All I know is that there was a LOT of it and all of the foam in the bilge was soaked, heavy, stinky, and nasty!

I imagine the positive foam flotation was a big selling point for people buying their first sailboat and/or for families. As it was primarily intended as a daysailor, the loss of storage space wasn't a big deal I guess.

Of course, if I get holed by a shipping container, I'm going to regret removing all that foam!
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Corinthian

Postby Clinton B Chase » Wed Mar 18, 2009 8:13 pm

I noticed the large foam filled compartment in the bow and immediately thought that would have to go and if it did I'd be able to stretch out for a nap down below. Very important after a day sail.

I am finding very little information out there on the Corinthian, but they are up for sale. For a boat that needs fairly large amount of cosmetic makeover, does $1500 seem a bit steep?

I was a little concerned about cracked fiberglass around the beam underneath the mast. Is this common to have this open wound and what seems to be the beginning of delamination? What was typically used those days as the beam, mahogany or plywood?

There isn't much in way of testimonials out there on how this boat performs. It seems like with a SA/D of 15.8 and the inboard sheeting coupled with a spinnaker, that the boat would be quite exciting to sail. It's fixed keel would mean safety and open water capability. I've seen prettier boats, but they seem easy to find for sale and within reach, affordability wise.
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Postby Case » Wed Mar 18, 2009 11:13 pm

Why not get an Ensign? Or an older Daysailer version of the Sea Sprite 23. There are a couple nearby. Similar type of cockpit, very deep, not self bailing.

Those are pretty much the bigger sister of the Corinthian and has much higher SA/D, about 17.50 to 18. I sail a Sea Sprite 23 and its pretty good in light airs which is important if you want to sail lots during the summer. Its a touch sluggish with a jib under 10 knots but it will do well.

Prices are about 2500 and they may need less work or at least the same amount of work. Look in Craigslist and you will see at least 2 examples of either styles. Contact me if you did not find those boats in Craigslist.

Regarding the cracked fiberglass, thats not too hard of a fix for a boat of this size. Grind away the fiberglass, check the wood... replace it if needed and reglass. Or ignore it and make a 2x4 compression post right underneath it...

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Postby Duncan » Thu Mar 19, 2009 8:25 am

Case wrote: Look in Craigslist and you will see at least 2 examples of either styles.

Here's a neat service for searching Craigslist for sailboats - Sea Sprite search. It came up with four, all in the Northeast U.S..
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Postby Clinton B Chase » Thu Mar 19, 2009 8:42 am

Ensign is a possibility but like the sheer on the Seasprite, Sailmaster, Typhoon...I like sheer!

I wonder how big the cockpit is in the Seasprites? My minimum is 6'8"+ so I can lay down and nap after a sail. Very important, along with the sheer.
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Seasprite Cockpit

Postby bhartley » Thu Mar 19, 2009 9:44 am

I'm too lazy to walk outside and measure this morning, but the cockpit seats on the Seasprite are longer than our Cape Dory 25D and our Typhoon. We have the Weekender model. The Daysailor has longer seats (and a correspondingly bigger cockpit). We have nice cushions for Ariel (SS23) and wanted to use them on the 25D while Ariel was on the hard. No go. They are about 5" too long. That said, the seats are relatively narrow as you move aft.

I would definitely look at Seasprite 23s -- Weekenders are far more common. They have the lines you are looking for. The larger foredeck, wide side decks (for a smaller boat) and little cabin are a good choice for kids moving around too.

I would be happy to provide you with any measurements you might want. I just have to finish my coffee first!

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Postby Case » Thu Mar 19, 2009 9:56 am

Clinton B Chase wrote:Ensign is a possibility but like the sheer on the Seasprite, Sailmaster, Typhoon...I like sheer!

I wonder how big the cockpit is in the Seasprites? My minimum is 6'8"+ so I can lay down and nap after a sail. Very important, along with the sheer.


Its pretty much the same as the Ensign! The cockpits are similar. I think its 8 feet long or more, not too sure. Huge, to say in the least...

This is for the Daysailer version. Most are Weekenders which has a 6 feet something long cockpit. It looks like at least two in the Craiglist link above is Daysailers...

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Postby bcooke » Sun Mar 22, 2009 3:59 pm

Of course, if I get holed by a shipping container, I'm going to regret removing all that foam!



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Re: Bristol Corinthian

Postby triton274 » Fri Jul 01, 2011 3:31 pm

Sorry to bring back an old thread but it seemed like there was no reason to start a second thread;

I was wondering if the HULL of the Corinthian is cored or solid fiberglass?
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Re: Bristol Corinthian

Postby Rachel » Fri Jul 01, 2011 7:32 pm

I don't know for *sure* but if you are talking about the late 1960's era Bristol Corinthian, I would be somewhat surprised if it were not a solid fiberglass hull.
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Re: Bristol Corinthian

Postby Zach » Mon Jul 04, 2011 11:47 am

I've got to say, that the Bristol Corinthian is one of the prettiest boats I've seen.

I'm glad I saw this thread, as I saw one a few weeks ago and searched high and low... not finding what she was. Now I know.
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