Bristol 24…

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Bristol 24…

Postby dcstrng » Tue Apr 29, 2008 9:04 am

My wife and I are happily into a six month project (that looks like it’ll probably run two to three years) massaging our Bristol 24 back to life… am just looking for anyone who has knowledge about the care and keeping of this little chunk of a boat designed by Paul Coble.

For those not familiar, think of the Bristol 24 as a heavy Alberg-esque keel boat with slightly more full ends -- 6' headroom, 8' beam… very slack bilged, easy riding (for its size) when going to weather, and despite a pretty deep hull-body, quite stable underfoot (after about 10-deg heel…) with a 50%+ ballast ratio…

We’ve scoured the internet for Bristol information and have seen bits and pieces (the Bristol owners’ site has a smidgen, but usually we just pick up a paragraph here and a sentence there…). We know about the concern over the balsa-core deck (ours is largely in great shape – although cosmetically embarrassing…) and the main bulkhead (ours was rebuilt at one point, due to rot/delamination it appears). Ours appears to be the iron (and whatever) ballast later models because it doesn’t have the larger sump like the original lead ballast models were reputed to have… The rear plywood bulkhead at the motor-well is a concern on some Bristol 24’s, although ours is glass (not wood) and seems quite solid – however, we had to rebuild the supports for the outboard motor-mount.

We did find a few blisters (less than a dozen) which didn’t surprise me a whole lot because she was more or less abandoned at her mooring for the five years preceding our acquiring her last summer – and the water was knee deep in cabin when we first boarded… We also had to grind out and reglass a coffee-can lid sized delamination at the base of the keel… I think water settled in down behind the ballast and attacked this from the inside out – much like wood boats can do… not sure, but it’s fixed now…

Just looking to share maintenance, refurbishment and/or upgrade ideas (well, actually have very few ideas to share – trying to get free advice… <grin>) with other smallish Bristol owners or other pocket cruisers in this general size – however, no techno-gizmos please (we’re generally making her a gadget-free zone…). We’re getting ready to finish up the hull for now (not concours level, but we want to sail out the summer, and think through whether to haul again next winter for a major refurbishment or what next…).

Thanks…
Last edited by dcstrng on Thu Jun 05, 2008 8:50 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Jason K » Tue Apr 29, 2008 9:36 am

Hi Larry,

Welcome to the forum! I think you'll find that this is a tremendous resource where good people will give you a tremendous amount of the free advice you're looking for. :)

Some here also have encyclopedic knowledge about "plastic classic" boats and you'll get a bit more useful information about your Bristol 24. However, it sounds like you already know the trouble spots for your boat in particular. Many boats of this vintage have common characteristics and common issues - you'll find the answers to your questions here.

Also, there's an appetite for photos - particularly pre-project ones, so keep your camera handy.
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Postby dcstrng » Tue Apr 29, 2008 10:18 am

Thanks Jason – been lurking for a bit… seemed like a cordial and knowledgeable bunch, so I though I should sign up…

I'll work on finding a photo or two...
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Bristol 24

Postby David » Tue Apr 29, 2008 10:55 am

Larry,

I am in the midst of a restoration to my Bristol 29. You are certain welcome to read what I have done so far.

Good luck with her,

David
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Re: Bristol 24

Postby dcstrng » Tue Apr 29, 2008 11:43 am

David wrote:You are certain welcome to read what I have done so far...


Wow – looks to me you’re doing far more than a simple restoration… truly impressive !! Your hull below the water line looks better than ours probably ever will above – extraordinary.

My bride is by far the better wood-worker in the family, I specialize in the slimy-ooey-gooey stuff, so I’ve got to get her to spend some time looking through your site…

Other than refinishing and such, we’ve not figured out what and/or how much to do to the cabin area of ours… in the immediate future is a simple redoing the interior of the trunk-cabin… I like your use of hanging-knees for strength, and may need to see if we can’t plagiarize a tad… we’re toying with the notion of occassional bluewater travel (someday; before we’re totally on social security which ain’t far off…), so any easy way to increase strength is a good thing… in the short-run we’re planning to remove the decretive plywood fascia (mostly delaminated anyway) and substitute 3/8th marine plywood as a back-up to new opening ports… the ones we got (new, but inexpensive from the manufacturer’s over-run stock – Beckson…) don’t exactly match the fixed ports’ dimensions, so we plan to add the stiffer 3/8 ply and then reglass the cabin cut-outs to match the new ports, hoping the new plywood will add a bit of strength as well as beginning to improve the appearance…

Among other things, we scrounged up a bronze Nico traveler over the winter and plan to add it to the aft of the cockpit – getting rid of the V-stationary block system and moving the sheeting forward about 18” on the boom… the traveler is a tad oversized, but the little rascal has the heft to take it, I think – willowy doesn’t apply to our little rascal, shapely yes; svelte, no… But for right now we’re mostly up to our ears with the simple basics; hull, sails, running rigging and the like…
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Postby Rachel » Tue Apr 29, 2008 12:31 pm

Welcome, Larry!

I've always like the Bristol 24s - I looked at a few during one round of boat shopping.

Of course a photo is worth a thousand words (and we do like our photos!), but do you have the "settee" layout or the "dinette"?

Looking forward to hearing and seeing more,

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B24

Postby David » Tue Apr 29, 2008 12:40 pm

Larry,

Do you have the dinette interior or the forward galley design? Take heart, I have a good friend who lived on a B24 for a year in St Pete with his wife and three teenaged daughters (and they are still together). B24's just bring families closer...

The Bekson ports will outlive the boat. The are very tough and spares will always be available. It's easy to trim off the spigot with a bandsaw to make them flush.

Good luck with her,

David
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Postby Hirilondë » Tue Apr 29, 2008 7:39 pm

dcstrng wrote:

I'll work on finding a photo or two...


That may do for an intro, but many here will want more!

Welcome.
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Re: B24

Postby dcstrng » Wed Apr 30, 2008 8:08 am

David wrote:Larry,Do you have the dinette interior or the forward galley design? David


We have the dinette model… although I’m thinking through how to modify it slightly so the “table” is usable from the quarter-berth as well (probably some fashion of a throw-over counter or something), and am also toying with making a set of brackets so that the port-side “double berth” becomes simply a single sea berth, by using a moveable weather-board (similar to an arrangement I had on an Irwin years ago…). But those are projects for another day; right now we need to get the simple basics done for the season so we can sail again…

The priority at the moment is to get the hull painted from the deck down (just waiting on the weather to cooperate) and then to sail a bit (grandkids want to get on the water – soon…) and in the interim my bride and I will figure out how far we want to take the refurbishment and mods… After living aboard boats that are decidedly larger, it is a real treat for me because although much of the same things need to be done/maintained, the actually workload is much less – so projects (for the most part) are just pleasant diversions, not onerous tasks…

We did that band saw thing on Beckson ports I had on my Irwin CC twenty years ago, and hope to do the same with this little rascal – spent the winter getting my wife’s woodshop built, but need to retrieve her band saw and a few other table saws from her shop in NoDak… Am planning to get those pliable eyebrows for the front two ports – worked good on a previous boat to allow the port to stay open when anchored in a drizzle – but are flexible enough that skinned shins and ankles generally aren’t a concern when scrambling around on deck…

I don’t have one of those photo-bucket things, so had to use a work-around to post pics… not much to new show; unless someone just likes to see pictures of some old guy laying on the ground grinding hardened epoxy…

Image
Angles Wings, as we found her; note marine growth 8" above waterline after years unattended...



Image
Cabin as we found her -- see "waterline" in forepeak -- smelly water was knee-deep when grandson boarded for first time... Wasps, slime and who knows what all... what a mess... but we sailed here outa there a month or so later...

Image
Wow, a whole ecosystem right there -- from being moored unattended for some years after the bottom paint packed-up... Maybe if we don't look at it, it'll go away on its own... haulout, after a trip down the bay (and carrying to much sail, she touched 6.1kts by the GPS, with a one knot tidal boost...) where she averaged about 3.9kts in 24...
Last edited by dcstrng on Thu May 01, 2008 9:40 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby dcstrng » Thu May 01, 2008 9:36 am

Okay, I figured out how to add a couple "get-acquanted" pics to the previous...
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Postby Rachel » Thu May 01, 2008 9:42 am

Larry,

Thanks for the photos - nice to see your boat.

Rachel

Potentially worthless aside:
Say, was this boat at Crown Pointe Marina when you bought her? I feel like I might have seen this boat in "for sale" mode, but it was last spring, and the boat was on the hard (which doesn't really fit with what you said).
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Postby David » Thu May 01, 2008 11:16 am

Larry,

She looks good with black topsides. Seems like you don't have a not of bottom paint to scrape off. Do you have blister issues?

David
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Postby dcstrng » Thu May 01, 2008 12:46 pm

David wrote:Larry, Do you have blister issues?

David


Had probably 8-10 blisters and/or major gouges that needed the WEST treatment… and one 6” diameter delamination, plus another area I’m not sure what the deal is yet (if anything), but for now she’s patched, faired and going back in the water as soon as the weather cooperates enough to get the paint done…

Wish I’d seen that discussion with what appears to be a garboard plug (Hamilton Marine), I’d have put one in back by the rudder – should have remembered that from my few wood boats, but completely slipped my mind… I’m suspicious that bilge water is getting around the ballast bedding, but am not sure – and maybe led to the delamination over the winter on the hard… When I opened up the keel delamination (just ahead of the rudder, right at the bottom…) no water came out, but…?

Anyway, this is a sailing project… so we’re going to fix a little and sail a little, and then haul her again next fall for another more thorough going over… regrettably, right after we got her home last summer I spent the next few months traveling off and on, and we’ve gotten to know her better out of the water than in…

Really don’t know too much about the history of the boat, except she’s been pretty neglected in recent years (not even registered since `02-`03 as I recall), but spent twenty something years being actively sailed up East by the same owners… Then moved to the Bay half a dozen years ago or so and was moored in a community creek off the Severn River near Annapolis -- but the owners have gone on to other things so all we knew was the community wanted her moved reasonably quickly… then the former owners quit corresponding, and I had to appeal to the state directly for title transfer – finally got that all squared away, so it’s time to finish the paint, put the name/numbers on, mend a few sails, change the plugs in the outboard and take the grandchildren day-sailing while we get the cushions recovered…

With us it’ll probably never be a true museum piece, but she is looking better and we fell in love with Coble’s hull lines, and even with a filthy bottom she sailed nicely -- like a much larger boat -- so we’re having fun…

Image

Grandson did most of the work, I get the credit -- what a deal...

Image

Deck and cabin are still frightful, but it's getting to be sailing season and with fresh topside and bottom paint, the hull is close to passing the 10-foot test...
Last edited by dcstrng on Wed Jun 04, 2008 3:12 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Postby Rachel » Thu May 01, 2008 4:42 pm

Sounds like it's not the same boat I saw - I thought it might be because it's in the same area and you don't see that many black ones.

A sailing restoration - now there's a concept :D

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Postby dcstrng » Mon May 05, 2008 7:40 am

Photo updates... a productive weekend... but then on reality-size craft, progress occassionally comes in fits and starts...

Image
Sure hope this looks better when the tape comes off... Brightside looks okay in the photo, but we're not too impressed... hoping...

Image
Whose idea was "red" anyway... good grief, it's everywhere...

Image
Okay, now she's begining to show a little personality...

Image
Family affair -- the youngsters did much of the hull painting... and work cheap!


Image

Back in her slip -- guess we got enough rocker in the boot-stripe, eh...
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Postby Gerald A. Gotts » Tue Jul 01, 2008 12:30 am

Larry, I have been away from sailing for several years. Actually I am more of an armchair sailor I suppose. I recently was given a Bristol 24 standard. Mine was a mess too. I didn't have quite as much water inside as you did but yucko ! I found nearly enough garbage in the cabin to nearly fill a 4 yard dumpster which I suppose lets me know I could probably haul freight with the boat. After about 1 hrs. work I swear the boat rose in the water a foot, or maybe it was just the tide ? Anyway, I am very much a novice at this but I'm enjoying the work a lot. I didn't have a rub rail on my boat and am wondering if anyone has an idea on a " cheap " material I could use to replace it. I am on a very limited budget as I'm retired and on the old fixed income thing. I hope you continue to send your comments in to this forum and I will do the same. I am very interested in your project. I am in Crystal River Florida .

My plan is to eventually live aboard and sail around Florida and the Bahamas etc.

Cheers

Jerry " Master of the Poop deck "
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Postby dcstrng » Wed Jul 02, 2008 9:39 am

Gerald A. Gotts wrote: I am on a very limited budget as I'm retired and on the old fixed income thing... My plan is to eventually live aboard and sail around Florida and the Bahamas etc...


Hey Jerry – good luck with your B24… for whatever reason, the little Coble Bristol’s seem to generally receive far less TLC than many other boats, especially the slightly lighter Alberg designs which often enjoy a rather rabid following, so the initial cost can be somewhere between cheap and free, but then the elbow-grease begins… Ours has been coming along very slowly in the last couple of months because land-based pressures have kept us out of town more than we planned, but we keep plugging away… this weekend I plan to start filling old holes in the deck, and other odds and ends so that we can contemplate paint once we’ve changed the ports…

I know what you mean about getting the garbage out… we took many garbage bags to the dumpster, by dinghy as it was initially at an unattended mooring… We’re missing about four feet of rub-rail on the stern of ours… haven’t replaced it yet, but just eyeballing it, West Marine ($?$?$) has a suitable replacement…

We also are hoping to light out for bigger water someday… I think the general Paul Coble design is more than capable, although Bristol cut corners in just enough areas, that it (ours at least) needs a thorough going-over… we’re toying with some modest rigging changes – chain-plates and double lowers and a few odds and ends – but that’ll be another year… What little sailing we’ve done, we’re pretty pleased and she behaved very ladylike up through a moderate chop and wind 20-25kts with all the sail up (middle of the night, geriatric skipper was having a brain-cramp, for peace of mind probably should have shortened down a touch…). Good uncomplicated boats; quite the little chunks, and rather forgiving…
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Postby Gerald A. Gotts » Thu Jul 03, 2008 9:36 pm

Larry, Good to hear from you. My boats brass plate says sailstar and the registration says 1968. I understand this was an early Bristol but is mine an Alberg design or a "Coble " . I have never heard the name Coble mentioned before. I can't seem to find out much about this little boat other than the info. on the Bristol web-site and the occasional sailor with one such as yourself.

Jerry
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Postby Triton 185 » Fri Jul 04, 2008 2:35 am

Family affair -- the youngsters did much of the hull painting....


This is one of the best reasons to work on and sail a boat.
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Postby dcstrng » Fri Jul 04, 2008 9:32 am

Gerald A. Gotts wrote:is mine an Alberg design or a "Coble " . I have never heard the name Coble mentioned before. I can't seem to find out much about this little boat other than the info. on the Bristol web-site and the occasional sailor with one such as yourself. Jerry


Jerry; from what I've read, all of the Bristol 24s, whether Sailstar or under the Bristol banner, were the same Paul Coble design. The Bristol 24 became something of an orphan, even though it had a very successful production run over many years. The other smaller Bristol's in that era, 22 through 26 foot, had well-known designers from Alberg to Hershoff, but the 24 was Mr. Coble's only recreational design as far as I know -- or at least the only one that bears his name, although he worked on several other designs that were known under the design firms of the day. He worked with several of the dominant design firms in those days; however, the main reason we didn't hear more about him was that he went on to designing naval vessels tugboats and heavier machinery. Rather than staying with yachts. The last I heard, he still ran his own marine survey firm up east somewhere and was in his 80s. Also, he was teaching at some local college in the area of marine design, survey or maintenance or something like that.

Here’s a little history on Paul:

============

Born in Newark, New Jersey in 1923, Paul began his studies at the Stevens Institute of Technology with a concentration in Mechanical Engineering…. When World War II interrupted his studies, Paul joined the U.S. Merchant Marine and traveled the world sailing with a number of American steamship companies. He rose from a Deck Cadet to an Able Seaman and finally to a Licensed 2nd Officer (any ocean, any tonnage).

At this time, in fields such as yacht design and boat building, the associated skills involved were extremely specialized. It was rare to find someone who could move easily from one discipline to another. Paul is such a person. He began as a joiner with Cape Cod Shipbuilding in Wareham, Massachusetts, and went on to work as a boat builder, loftsman, draftsman, designer, engineer, and supervisor for Bob Derector, Bill Luders, Phil Rhodes, Sparkman & Stephens, the Nevins yard, the Minneford yard, O’Day Sailboats, and Pearson Yachts, among others….

Work included building plugs for small fiberglass daysailers; designing production yachts (Bristol 24, of which over 800 were produced); designing and constructing minesweepers for the U.S. Navy; supervising construction of Columbia, Constitution, and Intrepid (three Sparkman & Stephens designed America’s Cup defenders built on City Island, New York); and serving as production planning engineer for nuclear submarines at General Dynamics….”

============

Even though most of the Bristol's in that era tended to be of heavier displacement compared to many modern boats, Mr. Coble’s design was even slightly heavier, and as you can see, the 24 carry around a little bit of history. The ballast ratio is decidedly high compared to modern vessels running right at 50%. But that's how he got away with the really slack bilged design, even by Alberg standards. I'm sure it cuts into our payload capacity somewhat, but as you may have discovered with yours, once heeled to about 10 or 12-deg, these little chunks don't heel a whole lot more unless we're just carrying too much sail -- been ther, did that. 3000 pounds of ballast on a something like 18 foot waterline will do that even with slack bilges.

If yours is a 1968 model, then you may have one of the ones that had lead ballast. The iron ballast ones, like ours, have very little sump area below the floorboards -- only about 2 to 4 inches in ours. The lead ballast ones, have about a foot or little less of space between the floorboards and the top of the encapsulated ballast, at least as far as I can recall...
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Postby Rachel » Fri Jul 04, 2008 9:33 am

Paul Coble is definitely the designer of the Bristol/Sailstar/etc. 24. I can't remember if he is still alive now (if so he'd be elderly), but he's a yacht designer and surveyor. I remember there was a good article about him (and perhaps interview) in Professional Boatbuilder in the ~2004/2005 time frame. I bet you might be able to get a copy from Professional Boatbuilder.
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Postby dcstrng » Fri Jul 04, 2008 10:04 am

Triton 185 wrote:
This is one of the best reasons to work on and sail a boat.


Yes sir; ain't that the truth... !! 11 year old grandson took to the orbital sander like he'd done it for decades; and was the brush through three coats of Brightside...
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any more on the bristol?

Postby kendall » Mon Sep 08, 2008 8:48 pm

I'm heading out to look at one later this week.

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Re: Bristol 24…

Postby tomwatt » Sun Dec 06, 2009 2:04 pm

Reaching down into the bottom of things to dredge up an old thread here...
but I am now the owner of a 1968 Bristol Corsair 24. Mine is structurally in good shape, but the interior has already been gutted (I got a super cheap deal on someone else's abandoned project). And while I have some ideas and info about what I want to do with the interior, I would appreciate any photos of what the interiors used to look like, since mine is down to bare fiberglass.
The interior had a bit of water in it, so once I get it cleaned and de-stinkified, things will be more photogenic. I'm also a photographer, so will be taking lots of in progress images, and hope to get this thing in the water sometime next warm season.
And if anyone can point me towards a deal on interior cushions, please let me know. Otherwise, I'll be digging out my yard-sale Sears sewing machine and slogging away. And if cushions don't happen before the first float, a couple of Therma-rest mattresses will have to get me through.
Image
Here she is in all her glory (so far)... going to be a long haul I'm afraid.
Layout is the dinette version.
Comments are certainly welcome. Encouragement and advice highly appreciated!
Formerly owned Sailstar (Pre-Bristol) Corsair 24
Still own Old Town Millenium 160 kayak.
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Re: Bristol 24…

Postby bcooke » Sun Dec 06, 2009 3:28 pm

Nothing is more expensive than a free boat. Sounds (and looks) like the boat is going to need more than new cushions. Are you ready for this?

I just finished posting something about starting new threads so I won't say more about it :-)
(feel free to start a new thread)
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Re: Bristol 24…

Postby Rachel » Sun Dec 06, 2009 5:08 pm

Hi Tom, and welcome to the forum!

I don't know, Britton, do you think it's bad to tack on to an older thread if it's the same subject? I think I prefer having it all (or mostly) in one place. This way, the person writing has usually reviewed the thread, soaked up the knowledge therein, and won't be posting the exact same question that people took the time to respond to earlier (when the thread was new). I suppose they could do that on their own, and then start a new thread, but then the people answering don't know that the poster did that, don't remember what was in the thread, etc.

It's even nice when searching (later) because you can come up with a gold mine :)

So, back to the boat: Yes, I can agree that it looks like free could be too much to pay for a boat like that, unless you have your reasons for wanting a project such as it represents. A few I can think of are as follows:

1) You don't have more money now, and even though you know you will spend double in the long run, you'd rather have a boat during that long run than you would to buy a better boat later, for less than that "long run" total.

2) You just like working on projects, as much or more than sailing.

3) You are picky, and you know that even on a boat in "good" condition, you wouldn't be happy until you tore it apart and rebuilt it your/the-right way.

4) This particular boat has meaning to you (it was your family's boat, etc.)

Reasons not to buy (or take for free) a project boat:

1) You think it will cost less to have a decent (not perfect, see #3 above) boat in the long run.

2) You want to get out sailing now or within a few months.

3) You want to make a profit in selling it, including your labor (this is possible, as people we know demonstrate, but very, very unusual).

Of course there are exceptions to the above, but they are just some of my thoughts.

On your Bristol, can you tell if it had the "dinette" or the "standard" layout? Dinette had the galley all along the starboard side, plus a slightly dinette shaped table/settee on the port side. Standard had two small galley flats at the forward end of the saloon, followed by settees each side which ran partially under the cockpit. Neither had cockpit settee lockers, but the dinette plan did have a locker under the port side cockpit that was accessible through a small door in the bulkhead at the after end of the saloon. The dinette plan had more of a bulkhead mast support, while the standard had the more-typical mast beam over a passageway.

I think I have photographs of both, but might as well concentrate on the one you have (or want).

Again, welcome. I'm sure we're all going to be glad that you are a photographer; we love our photos!

Rachel
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Re: Bristol 24…

Postby okawbow » Sun Dec 06, 2009 7:26 pm

tomwatt wrote:project). And while I have some ideas and info about what I want to do with the interior, I would appreciate any photos of what the interiors used to look like, since mine is down to bare fiberglass.
Layout is the dinette version.
Comments are certainly welcome. Encouragement and advice highly appreciated!


I have a 1976 bristol 24. It has the inboard diesel, and the engine box that makes the interior a little different from the outboard models. When you replace the interior; remember that the bulkhead and door posts help support the mast load. Otherwise, anything goes. here are a few pictures of mine, in various stages of work.
Attachments
Bristol cabin 006-2.jpg
Bristol cabin 001-2.jpg
Bristol 24 table.jpg
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1976 Bristol 24
"Harmony"
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Re: Bristol 24…

Postby tomwatt » Sun Dec 06, 2009 9:45 pm

Given the scarcity of info on Bristol 24s on the Internet, I thought it better to clump all of this together, so I dug up this one for that reason.

Rachel, thank you for your comments. And for the moment, I'm hanging on to my cash, and have more time than money to play with. Do I mind doing the work, no. Am I picky...? a little. And yes, mine is unmistakeably the dinette layout, galley aligned along the starboard. Much of the ucky part of this boat is just dirt from sitting and will come clean with a good scrubbing. Hull needs cleaning, sanding and paint. I'm okay with that, I can manage most coatings pretty well. I do have a soft spot about 6" square along the port deck in the front area along the doghouse (cabin), but I can work that with little trouble I think.

And chuck (okabow), thanks so much for the photos. Yes, while mine has no inboard (that was my preference in choosing), the wood layout gives me something to go on.

I may start my own website for the rebuild. And yes, 'free' boats are the most expensive kind. But I can work this a little along.
Formerly owned Sailstar (Pre-Bristol) Corsair 24
Still own Old Town Millenium 160 kayak.
tomwatt
Bottom Paint Application Technician
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2009 12:25 pm
Location: Massachusetts
Boat Name: Traditions
Boat Type: Sailstar (Bristol) Corsair 24

Re: Bristol 24…

Postby Rachel » Sun Dec 06, 2009 9:54 pm

Hi Tom,

Sounds like you're going it it with the right mindset then.

One thing I've noticed on the Bristols I've seen (24 & 27) is that they seem to be a bit prone to bulkhead rot where the chainplates connect to them; so that might be one thing to give a close inspection.

Rachel
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Rachel
Master of the Arcane
 
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Re: Bristol 24…

Postby tomwatt » Sun Dec 06, 2009 10:08 pm

I'd read that too, Rachel, so I anticipated going over all the hardware carefully, replacing, waterproofing as needed, etc. So much good information available... and so much to learn. I'll get there, just have lots of work to do.
Formerly owned Sailstar (Pre-Bristol) Corsair 24
Still own Old Town Millenium 160 kayak.
tomwatt
Bottom Paint Application Technician
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2009 12:25 pm
Location: Massachusetts
Boat Name: Traditions
Boat Type: Sailstar (Bristol) Corsair 24

Re: Bristol 24…

Postby boyle » Sat Aug 28, 2010 7:56 pm

There are various bristol groups 4 in Yahoo groups and 1 in Google groups. I am the owner of Hull # 441 and I'm in the middle of a complete restoration. At this time I have the hull stripped bare including the cement/pig iron ballast removed. If you have any uestion feel free to contact me.
Stephen
S/V La Boheme
boyle
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Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2010 10:18 pm
Boat Name: La Boheme
Boat Type: Bristol 24


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